About Montgomery County MUD 18

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So far Montgomery County MUD 18 has created 22 blog entries.

Winter Newsletter

MUD 18 Newsletter
January – March 2023

Sign up for Alert Notifications

When you go to the MUD 18 website home page, a pop-up will appear asking you to sign up for emergency alerts. You can sign up for email alerts, text alerts, or both. At a minimum, we urge all customers to sign up for text alerts. We want to make sure all our customers can be notified in case of emergency. This system will be used only in emergency situations where the community needs to be notified for health or safety reasons. Also, please bookmark our website (http://www.mcmud18.com) as most questions about water, sewer, and trash pickup are answered there. If your water and sewer questions are not answered on our web site, contact our operator Hays Utility North at 936-588-1166. For trash and recycle information, contact Waste Management at 800-800-5804. Please remember the customer for Waste Management is M.U.D. 18, not Bentwater.

Recycling

Over the years Bentwater residents have done a great job of recycling, thereby reducing the amount of solid waste sent to the landfill. Each year the amount we recycle keeps going up. Waste Management furnished each homeowner a 96-gallon cart, with a YELLOW lid, for recycle items. Please only use this container for recycling. Home owners must supply their own container for trash pickup. Remember, only items placed in the bin with the yellow lid will be picked up for recycling as there is only the driver and the pickup is automated. If recyclables are placed next to the bin they will not be picked up. Cardboard boxes should be collapsed to fit in the bin. Even better, cut them up into smaller pieces, which will enable you to get more in the bin.

Always recycle: plastic bottles and containers, food and beverage cans, paper, cardboard and paper board, glass bottles and containers. Place only clean and dry recyclables in your recycling cart.

Do not recycle: food or liquids; Styrofoam cups or containers; loose plastic bags such as those from the grocery store or dry cleaners; film of any kind; bagged recyclables; batteries or electronics; green waste; clothing; furniture or carpeting; rope or wire; shredded paper. Since Waste Management is a single stream recycler (we do not have to separate items) it is important not to put anything in the recycler that will get caught in the spinning discs at the plant. If the discs get tangled with wire rope or plastic bags the system has to be shut down and cleaned out. Therefore, even wire hangers from the dry cleaners cannot be recycled.

Regular Trash Collection: Monday and Thursday

Please be sure your trash is at the curb by 7:00 a.m. on collection day.
Household garbage, grass clippings, leaves, branches and tree trimmings are collected at the curb. You are limited to 10 bags, bundles or containers per collection. Containers over 45 gallons must have all trash bagged.

Bulky Trash Collection: Thursday

Limit: Two bulk items
Acceptable items include moving boxes (please break them down and bundle them), old furniture, appliances, grass clippings, leaves, branches and tree trimmings.
Important: For the safety and protection of Waste Management employees and equipment, branches and tree trimmings need to be no greater than 3 inches in diameter and to be cut, tied and bundled into 4-foot lengths weighing no more than 40-50 pounds.

Please note! Waste Management can no longer dispose of CFC refrigerant containing items (refrigerators, freezers, etc.) without certification that the Freon has been properly removed and recycled, pursuant to current Federal law.

Unacceptable Items:
Gasoline & oil (cans/filters); vehicle tires; large pieces of metal; landscape materials; rocks; electronic waste (such as televisions/computers, monitors); construction debris (paint & carpet, etc.); glass (i.e. windows, bathroom mirrors resulting from construction projects); propane tanks.

MUD Meetings Open to the Public

Our regularly scheduled monthly meetings are the third Tuesday of the month at 9:30 a.m. in the Country Club Cypress Room. Meetings are open to the public. The agenda is posted on our web site and the message board in the breezeway entrance to the Country Club Grill near the Golf Pro-shop. Minutes from meetings are published on the MUD 18 web site.

Your MUD Board:
Susan McFarland, President
Lou Tichacek, Vice President
Gary Montgomery, Treasurer
Rex Cambern, Secretary
John Crystal, Assistant Secretary

Winter Newsletter2023-01-05T17:56:11-06:00

Winter Freeze Alert!

Montgomery County MUD 18
Winter Freeze Alert!

We are expecting a severe cold front to move through our area Thursday night, followed by prolonged freezing temperatures.  Action on your part is required in advance to avoid damage to your home’s pipes.

Outdoor pipes, pipes in unheated areas, and pipes that run along uninsulated exterior walls can burst if the water in them freezes and expands. This can shatter pipe seals or the pipes themselves, sending water pouring through your house. You can avoid thousands of dollars of damage to your home by taking a few simple measures.

Foremost, make sure you know where your home’s shut-off valve is, and how to turn it on and off.

Before the Freeze

  • Protect faucets, outdoor pipes and exposed pipes in unheated areas by wrapping them appropriately.
  • Insulate your outdoor water meter box and be sure its lid is on tight.
  • Cover any vents around your home’s foundation.
  • Drain and store water hoses indoors.
  • Protect outdoor electrical pumps.
  • Drain swimming pool circulation systems or keep the pump motor running. (Run the pump motor only in a short freeze. Running the motor for long periods could damage it.)
  • Drain water sprinkler supply lines.
  • Open the cabinets under sinks in your kitchen and bathrooms to allow heated indoor air to circulate around the water pipes.
  • Set your thermostat at a minimum temperature of 55 degrees, especially when you’re gone for the day or away for an extended period.
  • Let indoor faucets drip; it isn’t necessary to run a stream of water.
  • Make sure you know where your home’s shut-off valve is and how to turn it on and off.

If you leave town, consider turning off your water at the shut-off valve while faucets are running to drain your pipes. Make sure you turn the faucets off before you turn the shut-off valve back on. If you drain your pipes, contact your electric or gas utility company for instructions on protecting your water heater.

If Your Pipes Freeze

If a pipe bursts and floods your home, turn the water off at the shut-off valve. Call a plumber for help if you can’t find the broken pipe or if it’s inaccessible. Don’t turn the water back on until the pipe has been repaired. If the pipe hasn’t burst, thaw it out with an electric heating pad, hair dryer, or a portable space heater. Apply heat by slowly moving the heat source toward the coldest spot on the pipe. Never concentrate heat in one spot because cracking ice can shatter a pipe. Turn the faucet on and let it run until the pipe is thawed and water pressure returns to normal. Don’t use a blowtorch or other open-flame device. They are fire and carbon monoxide exposure risks.

Be a Good Neighbor

If you have a neighbor who is out of town, contact them to see if there is anything you can do to help them prepare for the freeze.

Questions?

Hays North Corporation has prepared the MUD’s facilities for freezes such as this.  However, if you see water leaking where it shouldn’t be, or if you have relevant questions or concerns, reach out to a customer service representative at Hays

Winter Freeze Alert!2022-12-21T12:44:37-06:00

Fall Newsletter

MUD 18 Newsletter
October – December 2022

2022 Tax Rate
The new tax for 2022 will be $0.26 per $100 of valuation.  This is a $0.03 drop from the previous year.  On average, the home valuation in the district increased about $50,000, and the Board wants to maintain the revenue as close as possible to last year.  Last year the average tax bill was $1,452, while this year it will be $1,454.  Please note that this is an average, meaning some bills will be higher and some bills will be lower than the average.  Everything will be based on your property’s assed value and if you had a successful protest outcome.  It is the intention of the Board to collect only what is needed to meet our debt obligations and our planned capital expenditures in the five year plan to maintain the Districts plant and equipment.

Construction on FM 1097
Starting October 3, 2022, you will begin to see construction on the South side of FM 1097 for a 12-inch water main from Water Plant 2 to the East entrance of Bentwater.  This project will loop Bentwater’s entire water district to provide redundancy and better maintain constant water pressure.  If for some reason there is an issue at one of our water plants the other plant will be able to maintain the district without any noticeable effect.

Suggested Watering Guidelines for Your Property
Proper watering is critical to your lawn’s health and vigor. Deep and infrequent watering is the best practice. This means wetting the soil to a depth of 3-5 inches per irrigation. This equates to 1-1.25 inches of water per week, split over several days.  Your run times should be adjusted based on how dry your yard is. Winter watering should have run times 50% less than your summer run schedule.

Watering is most beneficial to your grass when done in the morning (3 a.m. to 8 a.m.) rather than afternoon or evening.  Avoid overnight watering. Early morning watering allows the leaf blades to dry and reduces the risk of disease.  Do not water every day or two. Frequent, short watering encourages shallow roots, unhealthy grass plants, and turf susceptible to drought and disease.

Let the turf determine watering frequency. Since heat, humidity and rainfall vary, it’s best to water at the first signs of stress, not on a predetermined schedule.  As a note, St. Augustine turf has poor drought tolerance and requires more irrigation to survive during our long hot summers.

Water newer plants 3-4 times per week for no more than 5 minutes.  Keep the ground around new trees and shrubs moist initially using a soaker hose or drip line but gradually back off after two weeks.

Recommended Lawn Watering Schedule
Here are some general lawn-watering guidelines and tips:

Irrigation Spray Head Averages
Pop-up spray head: 10-12 minutes, 3 times per week = 1”
Rotary spray heads: 16-23 minutes, 3 times per week = 1”

Seasonal Watering Recommendations
January & February – Rainfall is usually adequate.
Water if no rainfall for four weeks.
March, April & May – Water only once per week if less than one inch of rainfall occurs.
June, July, August & Early September – Water each section heavily at least twice a week if less than one inch rainfall.

Late September & October – REDUCE WATER FREQUENCY!
Early fall is Brown Patch Season, and excess water triggers this disease. During September water only once per week if no rainfall and every two weeks in October if no rain.
November & December – Rainfall is usually adequate. Water if no rainfall for four weeks

Suggested Irrigation System Settings
Some irrigation timers have a seasonal adjustment setting that enables you to reduce or increase watering without changing zone settings.  Suggested settings for our area:

November, December, January and February = 0%
March              50%
April                 70%
May                  80%
June                  90%
July/August     100%
September        70%
October            50%

Your MUD Board:

Susan McFarland, President
Lou Tichacek, Vice President
Gary Montgomery, Treasurer
Rex Cambern, Secretary
John Crystal, Assistant Secretary

Fall Newsletter2022-10-05T12:56:38-05:00

Summer Newsletter

MUD 18 Newsletter
July – September 2022

Rate Increase

It has been 12 years since the last water rate change, and operating costs have risen significantly since then. To determine how much your Montgomery County MUD 18 District should be charging for water and sewer services, we asked Bleyl Engineering to review the existing rates in relation to operating and maintenance expenses.  Hays Utility North (which operates our water and sewer plants) provided billing and expense data for water and sewer usage and miscellaneous fees from March 2021 to February 2022.  District Data Services (which handles bookkeeping services for our MUD district) provided annual operating and maintenance (O&M) expenses for the same period as the utility billing.  After analysis, Bleyl informed us that the District’s O&M expenses exceeded its billing revenue by a total of $190,395 during the study period.  A new rate order was determined and applied to the test period, which gave the District a $555 surplus instead of a deficit.  In order to preserve our financial stability and keep the District on a sound financial footing, the board has decided to adjust the water rates accordingly.

The proposed new rate order, which will go into effect in August 2022, is as follows:

  Gallons                                  Rate       

0 to 4,000                                $15.00                         (+$5.00)
4,000 to 10,000                       $1.00 per 1,000 gal.  (no change)
10,001 to 15,000                     $1.50 per 1,000 gal.  (no change)
15,001 to 20,000                     $2.50 per 1,000 gal.  (+$0.50)
20,001 to 30,000                     $3.50 per 1,000 gal.  (+$0.50)
30,001 and over                      $4.50 per 1,000 gal.  (+$0.75)

With high heat and drought conditions continuing to impact usage, it is important to conserve water.  Since each property has different landscaping layouts and sizes, please review the following water guidelines and make adjustments to suit your particular conditions. A useful link for water conservation: https://www.infinityservicesllc.com/latest-articles/water-conservation-2022/

Suggested Watering Guidelines for Your Property

Proper watering is critical to your lawn’s health and vigor. Deep and infrequent watering is the best practice. This means wetting the soil to a depth of 3-5 inches per irrigation. This equates to 1-1.25 inches of water per week, split over several days.  Your run times should be adjusted based on how dry your yard is. Winter watering should have run times 50% less than your summer run schedule.

Watering is most beneficial to your grass when done in the morning (3 a.m. to 8 a.m.) rather than afternoon or evening.  Avoid overnight watering. Early morning watering allows the leaf blades to dry and reduces the risk of disease.  Do not water every day or two. Frequent, short watering encourages shallow roots, unhealthy grass plants, and turf susceptible to drought and disease.

Let the turf determine watering frequency. Since heat, humidity and rainfall vary, it’s best to water at the first signs of stress, not on a predetermined schedule.  As a note, St. Augustine turf has poor drought tolerance and requires more irrigation to survive during our long hot summers.

Water newer plants 3-4 times per week for no more than 5 minutes.  Keep the ground around new trees and shrubs moist initially using a soaker hose or drip line but gradually back off after two weeks.

Recommended Lawn Watering Schedule

Here are some general lawn-watering guidelines and tips:

Irrigation Spray Head Averages

Pop-up spray head: 10-12 minutes, 3 times per week = 1”
Rotary spray heads: 16-23 minutes, 3 times per week = 1”

Seasonal Watering Recommendations

January & February – Rainfall is usually adequate.
Water if no rainfall for four weeks.
March, April & May – Water only once per week if less than one inch of rainfall occurs.
June, July, August & Early September – Water each section heavily at least twice a week if less than one inch rainfall.
Late September & October – REDUCE WATER FREQUENCY!
Early fall is Brown Patch Season, and excess water triggers this disease. During September water only once per week if no rainfall and every two weeks in October if no rain.
November & December – Rainfall is usually adequate. Water if no rainfall for four weeks

Suggested Irrigation System Settings

Some irrigation timers have a seasonal adjustment setting that enables you to reduce or increase watering without changing zone settings.  Suggested settings for our area:

November, December, January and February = 0%

March              50%
April                 70%
May                  80%
June                  90%
July/August     100%
September        70%
October            50%

Your MUD Board:

Susan McFarland, President
Lou Tichacek, Vice President
Gary Montgomery, Treasurer
Rex Cambern, Secretary
John Crystal, Assistant Secretary

Summer Newsletter2022-07-06T14:13:31-05:00

Spring Newsletter

MUD 18 Newsletter

April – June 2022

Tips to Prevent a Leaking Water Heater Disaster

Fortunately, most water heater problems can be avoided with proper maintenance. If you follow these steps once or twice a year your water heater should last a long time, work efficiently, and avoid a leaking disaster.

1. Check Temperature & Pressure Relief Valve

Test the temperature and pressure relief valve (T&P valve) once a year to make sure it’s working properly. Use caution: The water in the tank is hot and can cause scalding burns. When you pull up or push down on the valve handle, hot water should come out of the overflow pipe. If it does not, it may need replacing. You can do this yourself but a better option is to call a professional plumber.

2. Drain Water

Periodically, about every 12-16 months, drain a bucket of water from the drain faucet at the bottom of the water tank to remove sediment. The sediment can corrode the unit and reduce heating efficiency.

You can drain your tank by attaching a garden hose to your drain valve, which can be found at the bottom of your water heater’s tank. Open your hot water tap closest to your water heater but a floor above (if possible). Then open the drain valve (use a bucket). Again, take care not to get burned by the hot water.

3. Check Water Lines

Check all of the water lines, fittings and valves connected to your water heater. Look for signs of leaking water. Using a flashlight, check under the tank for small leaks that could be caused by rust or corrosion.

4. Use a Drain Pan

Use a specially designed drain pan (also called a drip pan) under the water heater. They come in all sizes and are circular or square. You can find a decent drain pan for $15-30 at your local hardware or building supply store. Make sure it has a drain at the bottom, and periodically check to make sure it is not clogged.

5. Check the Sacrificial Anode

Water is known for causing rust, corrosion and general harm to metals. So have you ever wondered what prevents water from damaging the metal of your water heater tank? This protection is often provided by a sacrificial anode rod installed in your unit.

What Is a Sacrificial Anode Rod?

As the name suggests, a sacrificial anode rod is a long metal rod that hangs down from the top, inside the water heater. It “sacrifices” itself by attracting the corrosion and mineral buildup that otherwise would decay the hot water tank. As the water eats away at your sacrificial anode rod, it leaves the metal of your water heater tank untouched. Check this rod every couple of years. When heavily corroded (as in the bottom rod in the picture), replace it.

What causes some sacrificial rods to corrode faster than others? Water quality is the primary source of this difference. Hard water will lead to enhanced mineral buildup. On the other hand, water softened by the use of a sodium water softener will corrode the anode rod even faster due to the trace amounts of sodium in the water. If you have a softener you might consider replacing the anode rod every 2-3 years to prevent premature tank failure.

There is another type of anode rod that is available and that is a powered anode rod. Whenever your water heater tank is subjected to corrosive conditions, the magnetic anode rod releases electrons to the interior part of the water heater tank to protect it from corrosion. The powered anode rod combines well with the electrical current to offer an added protection from corrosion and rust. Besides, it increases the lifespan of the water heater tank. Some powered anode rods come with a twenty year warranty and are made of titanium. You will still have to do some maintenance but not as much. Remember they do have to plugged in to a power outlet.

Tankless Water Heater Maintenance

Tankless hot water heaters provide energy efficiency and hot water on demand. They are compact in size, and quickly becoming a popular choice for both residences and businesses. Like anything else, however, proper maintenance is required. An annual checkup is recommended ensure the components are working properly.

Tankless Water Heater Maintenance Procedure

  • Flush and descale of the heat exchanger
  • Clean fan and burner assembly
  • Clean the air inlet thermistor and filter
  • Inspect and clean the igniter and flame sensor
  • Clean the entering water filter
  • Carefully inspect the vent for proper slope and check for any blockages
  • Check gas pressure
  • Test fire unit
  • Check flow rate
  • Check operating temperature

You can perform this maintenance yourself or have a professional do it for you. The largest expense for a DYI project would be the submersible pump and the clothes washer hoses for the vinegar flushing of the tank.

Your MUD Board:
Susan McFarland, President
Lou Tichacek, Vice President
Gary Montgomery, Treasurer
Rex Cambern, Secretary
John Crystal, Assistant Secretary

Spring Newsletter2022-04-05T16:10:59-05:00

Winter Newsletter

MUD 18 Newsletter

January – March 2022

Holiday Trash Service

Waste Management will follow the normal pick up schedule as Christmas and New Year’s fall on a Saturday this year.

Sign up for Alert Notifications

On the MUD 18 website home page on the right side is a link to sign up for emergency alerts.  You can sign up for email alerts, text alerts or both.  We urge all customers to sign up.  This newsletter will be sent out via the POA E-blast, the MUD 18 E-blast and as an attachment to the monthly water bill. If you do not receive this newsletter via the MUD 18 email you will know you are not registered.  We want to make sure all our customers can be notified in case of emergency, so please sign up. Also, please bookmark our website (http://www.mcmud18.com) as most questions about water, sewer and trash pickup are answered there. Your address will not be shared with anyone else. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Winter storms: Tips for Preparing Your House and Pipes

Since each home is different use these tips as a guide and do what is best for your home.

  1. Know your insurance coverages
    • Burst pipes: Ask your agent if your home or renter’s policy covers sudden and accidental water damage. This coverage pays for damage from burst pipes. Flood insurance doesn’t pay for damage caused by burst pipes.
    • Home and renter’s policies might not pay for damages caused by frozen pipes if you didn’t take steps to protect your pipes, such as keeping the heater on in your house.
    • Food spoilage: If the food in your refrigerator spoils because of a power failure caused by something your policy covers, your policy should pay up to $500 to replace your food. And often there’s no deductible. Take pictures and keep a list of spoiled food.
  1. Prepare days before a freeze
    • Wrap outdoor pipes as well as indoor pipes in unheated areas (like a clothes washer in your garage).
    • Drain indoor house fire sprinklers.
    • Remove water hoses and wrap outdoor pipes.
    • Drain and turn off your lawn sprinkler system.
    • Turn off the water to your clothes washer if it’s in an unheated garage.
    • Store your lawn equipment in a garage or shed to keep them in good condition for next year. Drain the gas.
    • If you leave your house before a freeze, turn off the water at the shutoff valve and leave your heat on.
    • Wrap tender plants but be sure to unwrap them promptly once the freeze is over.
  1. During the freeze
    • Protect your pipes when it freezes:
      1. Let faucets drip from the cold and hot taps.
      2. Open cabinets under sinks to let your house’s heat warm the pipes.
      3. If your pipes freeze, turn off the water at the shutoff valve. This prevents broken pipes from leaking into your house after they thaw.

 

 

General Property Watering Guidelines

Proper watering is critical to your lawn’s health and vigor. Deep and infrequent watering is the best practice. This means wetting the soil to a depth of 3‐5 inches per irrigation. This equates to 1 – 1.25 inches of water per week, split over several days.  Your run times should be adjusted based on how dry your yard is. Winter watering should have run times 50% less than your summer run schedule.

Watering is most beneficial to your grass when done in the morning (5 a.m. to 10 a.m.) rather than afternoon or evening.  Avoid overnight watering. Early morning watering allows the leaf blades to dry and reduces the risk of disease.  Do not water every day or two. Frequent, short watering encourages shallow roots, unhealthy grass plants, and turf susceptible to drought and disease.

Let the turf determine watering frequency. Since heat, humidity and rainfall vary, it’s best to water at the first signs of stress, not on a predetermined schedule.  As a note, St. Augustine turf has poor drought tolerance and requires irrigation to survive during our long hot summers.

Water newer flowers 3 to 4 times per week for no more than 5 minutes.

Keep the ground around new trees and shrubs moist initially using a soaker hose or drip but gradually back off after two weeks.

Recommended Lawn Watering Schedule

Here are some general lawn watering guidelines and tips:

Irrigation Spray Head Averages

Pop-up spray heads: 10 to 12 minutes 3 times per week = 1”

Rotary spray heads: 16 to 23 minutes 3 times per week = 1”

Seasonal Watering Recommendations

January & February – Rainfall is usually adequate.

Water if no rainfall for four weeks.

March, April & May

Water only once per week in the spring if less than one inch of rainfall occurs.

June, July, August & Early September

Water each section heavily at least twice a week if less than one inch of rainfall.

Late September & October — REDUCE WATERING FREQUENCY!

Early fall is Brown Patch Season and excess water triggers this disease. During September water only once per week if no rainfall and every two weeks in October if no rain.

November & December

Rainfall is usually adequate. Water if no rainfall for four weeks

Suggested Irrigation System Settings

Some irrigation timers have a seasonal adjustment setting that enables you to reduce or increase watering without changing zone settings.  Suggested settings for our area:

 

November, December, January and February = 0%

March              50%

April                 70%

May                 80%

June                90%

July August   100%

September     70%

October           50%

MUD Meetings Open to the Public

Our regularly scheduled monthly meetings are the third Tuesday of the month at 9:30 a.m. in the Country Club Cypress Room. Meetings are open to the public. The agenda is posted on our web site and the message board in the breezeway entrance to the Country Club Grill near the Golf Pro-shop. Minutes from meetings are published on the MUD 18 web site.

Your MUD Board:

Susan McFarland, President
Lou Tichacek, Vice President
Gary Montgomery, Treasurer
Rex Cambern, Secretary
John Crystal, Assistant Secretary

Winter Newsletter2021-12-22T13:13:45-06:00

Fall Newsletter

Board of Directors

The MUD 18 Board of Directors consists of five members elected by registered voters in the District for staggered four-year terms. Nancy Busen retired from the MUD 18 Board effective May 30, and John Crystal was named to serve the remainder of her term, which expires May 2024. Other Board members are Gary Montgomery, Susan McFarland, Rex Cambern and Louis Tichacek.

Tax Rate for 2021

The District assesses ad valorem taxes on all taxable property within the District in order to pay its debt obligations and continue to operate and maintain the District’s water and sewer systems. The Board of Directors is committed to levying only the taxes needed to meet these obligations and has lowered the District’s tax rate over the last 10 years. At the September 21, 2021 meeting, the Board continued its commitment and voted to lower the tax rate for 2021 to $0.29 per $100 of valuation from $0.32 per $100 of valuation. That’s a savings of $0.03 per $100 of valuation.

Also at the September meeting the Board voted to pay off $623,535 of callable bonds prior to their expiration date, which will save the MUD district $25,481 in future interest payments.

Suggested Watering Guidelines for Your Property

Proper watering is critical to your lawn’s health and vigor. Deep and infrequent watering is the best practice. This means wetting the soil to a depth of 3 to 5 inches per irrigation. This equates to 1 to 1.25 inches of water per week, split over several days. Your run times should be adjusted based on how dry your yard is. Winter watering should have run times 50% less than your summer run schedule.

Watering is most beneficial to your grass when done in the morning (5 a.m. to 10 a.m.) rather than afternoon or evening. Avoid overnight watering. Early morning watering allows the leaf blades to dry and reduces the risk of disease. Do not water every day or two. Frequent, short watering encourages shallow roots, unhealthy grass plants, and turf susceptible to drought and disease.

Let the turf determine watering frequency. Since heat, humidity and rainfall vary, it’s best to water at the first signs of stress, not on a predetermined schedule. As a note, St. Augustine turf has poor drought tolerance and requires irrigation to survive during our long hot summers.

Water newer plants 3 to 4 times per week for no more than 5 minutes.
Keep the ground around new trees and shrubs moist initially using a soaker hose or drip but gradually back off after two weeks.

Recommended Lawn Watering Schedule

Here are some general lawn-watering guidelines and tips:

Irrigation Spray Head Averages

Pop-up spray head: 10 to 12 minutes, 3 times per week = 1”
Rotary spray heads: 16 to 23 minutes, 3 times per week = 1”

Seasonal Watering Recommendations
  • January & February – Rainfall is usually adequate.
    Water if no rainfall for four weeks.
  • March, April & May
    Water only once per week in the spring if less than one inch of rainfall occurs.
  • June, July, August & Early September
    Water each section heavily at least twice a week if less than one inch rainfall.
  • Late September & October — REDUCE WATER FREQUENCY!
    Early fall is Brown Patch Season, and excess water triggers this disease. During September water only once per week if no rainfall and every two weeks in October if no rain.
  • November & December
    Rainfall is usually adequate. Water if no rainfall for four weeks
Suggested Irrigation System Settings

Some irrigation timers have a seasonal adjustment setting that enables you to reduce or increase watering without changing zone settings. Suggested settings for our area:

  • November, December, January and February- 0%
  • March- 50%
  • April- 70%
  • May- 80%
  • June- 90%
  • July/August- 100%
  • September- 70%
  • October- 50%
Reminders

Encroachments and Easements — If you are new to Bentwater and/or are thinking of changing the structure of your house or yard on any Bentwater property, please review the Bentwater Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions on the POA website. Sections 2.02-2.05 deal with easements. Residents may petition the MUD 18 board for Consents to Encroachment of water, sewer and utility easements.

Reporting a Problem — Do not assume the problem has already been identified or reported. If you observe a water leak, sewer odor, discolored water, open manhole, alarms are sounding, or other problems, please help us by calling Hays Utility Service at 936-588-1166. Hays has someone in Bentwater every day, seven days a week. They can and will respond 24 hours a day. Their general office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Sign-up for E-Blasts — If you are not receiving our E-Blasts, you are missing out on timely information. Go to our website at http://www.mcmud18.com and give us your email address. Your address will not be shared with anyone else. You can unsubscribe at any time.

MUD Meetings Open to the Public

Our regularly scheduled monthly meetings are the third Tuesday of the month at 9:30 a.m. in the Country Club Cypress Room. Meetings are open to the public. The agenda is posted on our web site and the message board in the breezeway entrance to the Country Club Grill near the Golf Pro-shop. Minutes from meetings are published on the MUD 18 web site.

Your MUD Board:
Susan McFarland, President
Lou Tichacek, Vice President
Gary Montgomery, Treasurer
Rex Cambern, Secretary
John Crystal, Assistant Secretary

Fall Newsletter2021-10-01T17:50:32-05:00

Trash Update- 7/22/2021

Please be advised that recycle collection service is currently behind schedule and is at high risk of not completing today. Crews will continue to work toward completing service today. We will return to complete service tomorrow in the event we do not finish today.

We apologize for any inconvenience the delay in service may cause. Thank you for your patience and flexibility while we work to complete service.

Trash Update- 7/22/20212021-07-23T20:38:13-05:00

Trash Update- 6/11/2021

Please be advised that waste collection service has not been completed on the streets identified below and will be recovered Friday, June 11, 2021.

The following streets will be recovered: Fairfield Dr., Cloverdale Ct., Claremont Ct., Highwood Rd., Wick Willow Dr., Bent Tree Ln., S. Wind Dr., Bentwood Dr., Wycliffe Dr., Hidden Creek Ln., Green Cove Dr. and Wingate Dr.

We apologize for any inconvenience the delay in service may have caused. Thank you for your patience and flexibility while we work to complete service.

Trash Update- 6/11/20212021-06-12T12:05:15-05:00

Hurricane Preparedness- 2021

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.  Keep in mind, you may need to adjust any preparedness actions based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. Their impacts can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur without it being a major hurricane.


The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone.  If you do, now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles, but have multiple options. Your destination could be a friend or relative who doesn’t live in an evacuation zone.  If you live in a well-built home outside the evacuation zone, your safest place may be to remain home.  Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.  As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


You’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of three days. Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, the CDC recommends bringing items that can help protect you and others from COVID-19, such as hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, bar or liquid soap, disinfectant wipes (if available) and two masks for each person. (Children under two years old and people having trouble breathing should not wear face coverings.)


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. Don’t forget coverage for your car or boat. Remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for it, and it’s available through your company, agent or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


If you plan to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.


Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes. Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now.  Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

Hurricane Preparedness- 20212021-11-30T20:38:01-06:00
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